Will modern science bring Thanksgiving to developing nations?

see "Breakthrough in genetics sows better wheat seed" (SF Chronicle, 11/24/06) http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/11/24/BAG4JMJ6EK1.DTL After cloning a gene from wild Israeli wheat into strains of modern American wheat, scientists have created a strain of wheat with substantially increased levels of protein, zinc, and iron. It's as fascinating as wheat cloning can be that the idea for this sort of improvement to wheat farming was discussed nearly 100 years ago by a scientist who saw the wild wheat growing in Israel, and then wrote about it for the USDA. According to the above article, "The World Health Organization estimates that the diets of more than 2 billion people in the world are deficient in zinc and iron, and that more than 160 million children under the age of 5 lack an adequate protein supply." Imagine the benefit this bit of scientific creativity can bring to the developing world, and without the (ridiculous) stigma that is attached these days to genetically-modified food since cloning does not qualify as genetic modification. It always amazes me, even though it shouldn't, that the world's scientists continue to find ways to make such huge improvements in parts of our lives, even during this age of people who believe they, or their society, already know just about everything. And here's my one piece of cynicism for the day: I wonder how long it will be, once they start working to distribute the new wheat seed, that some idiot suggests his country should refuse it because it was created in part by Israeli scientists. I have no doubt that someone somewhere will say the high-protein high-mineral wheat is part of a Zionist plot. Give Mel Gibson a few drinks and maybe he'll be the first....
No feedback yet